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videoman has contributed to 564 posts out of 463683 total posts (.12%) in 3,459 days (.16 posts per day).

20 Most recent posts:
Halo CE General Discussion » Adjutant News and Info! Dec 14, 2016 06:58 AM (Total replies: 945)

It's been a while since any sort of news or program update. Any word on either? I don't know if there is much else to be added or updated (that could be), but if the program is now finished, something about that would be nice.

Thank you!

Halo CE General Discussion » Adjutant News and Info! May 23, 2016 12:33 AM (Total replies: 945)

Quote: --- Original message by: R93_Sniper
Quote: --- Original message by: videoman
I just looked in the m60_rescue.map/Reclaimer Mission (which is where the Mammoth shows up in) file, and under the "levels" folder and nothing.


You mind sharing an image of the way your adjutant files are? The mammoth is considered a vehicle or giant (much like the scarab) and would be under render_model like everything else. If you're using the other view structure it would make sense as to why you wouldnt be able to find it the way im saying it would be there.


Based on Folder Hierarchy, the Mammoth is stored under "Vehicles" which makes sense because it's just a giant AI controlled vehicle.

Here are screenshots.







Also the "giants" folder only contains the Scarab.
Edited by videoman on May 23, 2016 at 12:34 AM

Halo CE General Discussion » Adjutant News and Info! May 22, 2016 09:02 PM (Total replies: 945)

Quote: --- Original message by: R93_Sniper
If i remember right, its in the level it appears in, render model, marked under "giants". You can use adjutant's search feature, too.


Would be nice if you read my post. I said I used the search feature, and it didn't find the Mammoth model. Also which map file are you talking about? I just looked in the m60_rescue.map/Reclaimer Mission (which is where the Mammoth shows up in) file, and under the "levels" folder and nothing. Also I am looking through the map file using the "Folder Hierarchy" view and not the "Tag Class" view.


Quote: --- Original message by: lolslayer
Quote: --- Original message by: videoman
For the life of me...
I went looking for the Mammoth (Tank?) model and cannot find it. I've looked at the m60_rescue.map file and no luck. I even used the search feature and nothing. I have a feeling it's not under the "Vehicle" folder, but I could be wrong. Even so I looked there anyways.

Anyone remember where the model file is located? I started looking under m70_liftoff, but then realized that that is the level after the Mammoth appears. Any help would be appreciated.


mammoth? Sounds like an interesting map, can you please link me to the download page?



What? Please reread my post. Mammoth isn't a map, it's a model.

Halo CE General Discussion » Adjutant News and Info! May 21, 2016 11:35 PM (Total replies: 945)

For the life of me...
I went looking for the Mammoth (Tank?) model and cannot find it. I've looked at the m60_rescue.map file and no luck. I even used the search feature and nothing. I have a feeling it's not under the "Vehicle" folder, but I could be wrong. Even so I looked there anyways.

Anyone remember where the model file is located? I started looking under m70_liftoff, but then realized that that is the level after the Mammoth appears. Any help would be appreciated.

Halo CE General Discussion » Installation 01 (Halo Fan Game) Thread Apr 20, 2016 07:21 PM (Total replies: 490)

Quote: --- Original message by: R93_Sniper
Quote: --- Original message by: videoman

I would have to agree. I am not a coder, but I have heard more then once that C# is both better and easier to learn then something like C++ (which UE4 uses, but Epic doesn't understand how class hierarchy works).

There's a saying "C makes it easy to shoot yourself in the foot. C++ makes it harder but when you do, you blow your entire leg off". C++ is definitely harder to learn but once you get the hang of it it's pretty stable.

And to be honest, if you don't like a Engine simply because it uses a different computer language then what you "like", then good luck in the real world when working with code.

Couldn't agree with you more. Most people who learn a coding language need to understand a variety of them. Most people, however, will settle for C#, C++, Unix, Java, Python, and occasionally Ruby. (I've taken a few courses with programming, while im no expert yet, this is some of the stuff I've picked up)

Unity is actually more versatile because of how it uses code. So using it for a Halo game is actually a good idea, as you have more flexibility to work with. UE4 has some good stuff, but when I have asked around (among the Programmer Dev Community) they have either worked with UE4 and said nope, or they look at how Epic has structured their code (and how poor their Documentation can be) and just face-palm.

Please restructure this because I cant actually understand what you're saying. I don't particularly know why im dissecting what you're saying but I feel like part of what you're saying is inaccurate anyways. Unity is nice for getting started because like BLAM it's pretty easy to learn and get into, but that comes at the cost of some limitations on both programming and utility ends. UE4 is significantly better than Unity when it comes to how far you can push it but it's also harder to learn as a result. Blueprint was made to alleviate that and has done its job, as you can see how many new games and scenes are being made rapidly with UE4 as opposed to Unity (and even CryEngine/Lumberyard, for that matter). The Unreal Documentation is also great, so I don't know who you were talking to about the docs. For anything that's not covered in the documentation (which there's very little) or needs a bit more in-depth explanations, Epic has set up a huge database of tutorial videos and community content to help you get started and on your way to making content. I know this for a fact as I've owned UE4 since before it went free and went through learning the engine strictly by their tutorials.


Anyways, I think Installation 01 switching from UE4 to Unity was a good idea. Because when I thought they had gone from Unity to UE4, I was scratching my head because I know how much a pain UE4 can be when making a game that doesn't rely fully on Blueprints.

I01 was never UE4. Also, Epic has made it even easier to go from Blueprints to code with their own built in BP->CPP Converter, as well as having a publicly available git to pull code from and modify your engine with. It's completely open ended and user friendly, I seriously want to know where you're getting your information from because a lot of it is blatantly wrong. I'm not trying to be aggressive (though it may come up as such, apologies if that ends up being the case), but I'm curious to see what sort of information you're getting and who is saying such.





First of all, the idea that Installation 01 was on UE4 came from this webpage:
http://nefranius-software.weebly.com/

When i was originally typing my first post my brain had thought that these two projects were the same, though going back I found out that was incorrect. So that was a fault on my part.

Now onto what you said while butchering my post. Unity is better in the ways of Developing a game in the fact that it is much more straight forward. When you need something to do something specific, all that is required is for you (or your local coder) to write a script and drop it onto a game object. Other then writing the code, that pretty much it.

However in UE4, there are more hoops you have to go through. The process of setting up a code script required more time and effort just to get the script going. While in Unity, you can just right-click in the content browser, choose which programming language you want to use, name the file and then you are done. Then just double click on the script and start coding.

UE4 makes the programmer(s) go through this giant process of pick and choose, just to get the script file setup even before coding even happens.

Also, UE4 (or more so Epic Games) has a notorious issue with their Documentation.

A) It's either unfinished (meaning the Community is usually in charge of figuring out exactly how something has to be done.

Or B) It's never kept up to date with the current version. So a lot of the time when coding in UE4, and you are in a new engine version, the keywords you used in the last version, don't work in the new version. And when you go to check what has been changed, most of the time it hasn't been documented yet.

Unity has a pretty good method down for how they do their Game Engine Business. From what I have seen, they update their documentation either before they release a new engine version, or within hours after they release it, and if not those, then they have it ready and updated. So as soon as the engine drops, they almost instantly push out the updated documentation.

Epic take their time with this, thus many users stay on the old Engine version for weeks to a month or more before they know they can properly transition over to the new engine version. This is a big problem when educational institutions are trying to teach UE4 (which I was at one that did), because when a student or teacher are trying to find something in UE4's documentation, it a lot of the time isn't there. Or it is there but there isn't enough information to properly troubleshoot the issue that is popping up.

And what I mean by how they structured their code is this.

In Unity, there is a centralized Class that you call from. It's called UnityEngine. This one over-arching container (and many coders sometimes put it) holds everything that relates to the engine. So from this one Class, you can then branch off and work with the classes that fall bellow.

However in UE4, you have two different Classes you have to pick from. One is called Objects, and one is called Actors. So because of this figuring out which one to use can be time consuming and tedious, thus resulting in slower Game Development due to a uncertainty in what needs to go where to function properly.

I'd like to point out that Unity's listed of released games (from 2014 - 2016) far surpasses that of UE4. Meaning games that have actually been released (not including TBD, Pre-Order or games that were going to be released but never did, which UE4 has a good chunk of non-released games). So that statement on how UE4 is allowing more games to be made, is not really true.

Check out the UE4 list here: https://wiki.unrealengine.com/Category:Games
Keep in mind that some of the games on the list that state they were released, actually never did. So either the team had set a date, but didn't meet it, or the team gave up and did other things.

Here is Unity's list of game made on their engine: https://unity3d.com/showcase/gallery/games

Even without loading another page of released games, games made with Unity far surpass games made with UE4. In the list of UE4 games, I counted 17 games that had either a day, month and year marked on them, or ones that actually said "Released". And I clicked on a few of them to find out that some of the "Released" game never actually got to into the market to be bought. So there are somewhat less the 17 games made and released on UE4.


Overall, Unity is a more used and successful engine. Both their documentation and amount of content made with the engine is far better then what UE4 has to offer. Sure, UE4 has fancy looking graphics, but that is because it was pre-coded by Epic games (and I think it is just a upgraded UE3 graphics plugin actually).

Unity looks rough only because it allows openness and flexibility to the Dev team. Meaning it is up to the Dev team to make it look the way they want it. Allowing more visually stylized games to come out of Unity, then UE4. UE4 is more for Semi-realistic games, and less for artistically stylized ones. Sure UE4 can do Cell-shading, but that just one art style. Compared to the numerous other art styles you can make a game look like.

Anyways I admit I was wrong about Installation 01 being on UE4, though it is understandable with the other Halo Multiplayer focused game also in the works that IS one UE4. Sometimes with all the multiple fan projects, your brain can mix things up a bit.

Halo CE General Discussion » Installation 01 (Halo Fan Game) Thread Apr 20, 2016 01:55 AM (Total replies: 490)

Quote: --- Original message by: DaLode
C# is great and definitely worth learning, not just for Unity.
It's a good programming language that'll be of use in the corporate world as well.


I would have to agree. I am not a coder, but I have heard more then once that C# is both better and easier to learn then something like C++ (which UE4 uses, but Epic doesn't understand how class hierarchy works). And to be honest, if you don't like a Engine simply because it uses a different computer language then what you "like", then good luck in the real world when working with code. Companies can use a verity of languages, from the C language, to Java, Python and so on. Game companies that usually use a pre-built engine (mainly Indie dev teams) have less room to work, but companies like Bungie, Bio-Ware, DICE, and so on usually have a team of programmers that build an engine from the ground up and the language is usually picked in a co-operate effort between the programmers and the team manager (or company owner sometimes).

Unity is actually more versatile because of how it uses code. So using it for a Halo game is actually a good idea, as you have more flexibility to work with. UE4 has some good stuff, but when I have asked around (among the Programmer Dev Community) they have either worked with UE4 and said nope, or they look at how Epic has structured their code (and how poor their Documentation can be) and just face-palm.

Anyways, I think Installation 01 switching from UE4 to Unity was a good idea. Because when I thought they had gone from Unity to UE4, I was scratching my head because I know how much a pain UE4 can be when making a game that doesn't rely fully on Blueprints.

Halo CE General Discussion » Installation 01 (Halo Fan Game) Thread Apr 19, 2016 11:28 PM (Total replies: 490)

Quote: --- Original message by: TheChunkierBean
Quote: --- Original message by: videoman
Looking pretty awesome so far! Using the UE4 engine can be a pain sometimes, but you guys seem to be handling it pretty well.

Are you using Blueprints at all? I saw in the trailer that a Visual Studio was showing in the background, so I take it you are using coding. But are you using Blueprints at all? I remember in the past reading a quote from a Epic employee and how they said that Blueprints are 4X slower then just using code. So I wasn't sure if Blueprints were a thing.

I hope the best for this project! I am looking forward to seeing more in-game gameplay being shown.

Also if you need help then let me know. Sort of trying to build a Single Player Halo game myself in UE4, so I've been trying to do what I can to learn more about working with UE4.

Let me know if the team needs help. I am mainly a 3D modeler. More on the architecture/structure side though. Still trying to master the art of modeling organics. x3


As Altis has stated, we are using Unity 5. However if you want to join as a 3D modeler than that would help a lot!



Shoot! My apologies. I thought you had gone from Unity to UE4 and not the other way around. That's on me. My bad.

It's weird be because the images I've seen recently looked like they were on UE4 (meaning recent development images), and the old image I saw were from when the game (I thought) was in Unity.

Halo CE General Discussion » Installation 01 (Halo Fan Game) Thread Apr 19, 2016 04:30 PM (Total replies: 490)

Looking pretty awesome so far! Using the UE4 engine can be a pain sometimes, but you guys seem to be handling it pretty well.

Are you using Blueprints at all? I saw in the trailer that a Visual Studio was showing in the background, so I take it you are using coding. But are you using Blueprints at all? I remember in the past reading a quote from a Epic employee and how they said that Blueprints are 4X slower then just using code. So I wasn't sure if Blueprints were a thing.

I hope the best for this project! I am looking forward to seeing more in-game gameplay being shown.

Also if you need help then let me know. Sort of trying to build a Single Player Halo game myself in UE4, so I've been trying to do what I can to learn more about working with UE4.

Let me know if the team needs help. I am mainly a 3D modeler. More on the architecture/structure side though. Still trying to master the art of modeling organics. x3

Halo CE General Discussion » Adjutant News and Info! Apr 14, 2016 06:56 AM (Total replies: 945)

Quote: --- Original message by: Super Flanker
The unreal guys get a kick out of you having to spend extra time in converting your halo textures.


I can't tell if you are being sarcastic, or a troll. No offense if you are being sarcastic.

Halo CE General Discussion » Adjutant News and Info! Apr 13, 2016 11:12 PM (Total replies: 945)

Quote: --- Original message by: Mootjuh
Quote: --- Original message by: videoman
Quote: --- Original message by: Mootjuh
Pretty sure bit depth is not the same as pper pixel precision. For example if you have your texture in 16-bit mode there is no way to save as tga. Baking for example a heightmap even with 32-bit pixel precision still leaves an 8-bit texture. Which is noticablenfor heightmaps as they turn the whole terrain into terraces.


The TIFF image format might be good, but the TGA format is a industry standard among game studios. As such, that would mean that TGA outputs a higher level of quality with the end-result texture. Otherwise, game studios would use something other then TGA if it wasn't showing high enough results with they game content.


Most devs use TIFF actually, TGA is used for 8-bit bitmaps because BMP, as the only other alternative, sucks.


Well I guess it depends on who you talk to then. xD
The people who do game development that I spoken to said they use TGA files.

My main point about TIFF vs TGA is that I am wondering why UE4 only accepts TGA files, but not TIFF files.

Halo CE General Discussion » Adjutant News and Info! Apr 12, 2016 09:49 PM (Total replies: 945)

Quote: --- Original message by: Extreme110
Quote: --- Original message by: lolslayer
Sorry for the dumb question, but what is the purpose of Adjutant? Couldn't find a real description for this

Just to add to what videoman talked about, it also does sound extraction which is my personal favourite feature.


Ah right. My apologies, I forgot about that feature when talking about Adjutant. I use it mainly for model extraction, so sounds are not incredibly important to me. Even though they are nice to have. xD

@lolslayer:
There is no such thing as a dumb/stupid question. Only a stupid answer. It is the perception of the question that people base the level of intelligence of the question. However that is their fault, not the person asking the question. Asking questions is what humans have done since we were able to start questioning things in our world and the universe it resides in.

Never feel like a question is stupid. Only expect a stupid answer from people. Lol

Halo CE General Discussion » Adjutant News and Info! Apr 12, 2016 03:42 PM (Total replies: 945)

Quote: --- Original message by: Mootjuh
Pretty sure bit depth is not the same as pper pixel precision. For example if you have your texture in 16-bit mode there is no way to save as tga. Baking for example a heightmap even with 32-bit pixel precision still leaves an 8-bit texture. Which is noticablenfor heightmaps as they turn the whole terrain into terraces.


The TIFF image format might be good, but the TGA format is a industry standard among game studios. As such, that would mean that TGA outputs a higher level of quality with the end-result texture. Otherwise, game studios would use something other then TGA if it wasn't showing high enough results with they game content.

Halo CE General Discussion » Adjutant News and Info! Apr 12, 2016 12:15 PM (Total replies: 945)

Quote: --- Original message by: lolslayer
Sorry for the dumb question, but what is the purpose of Adjutant? Couldn't find a real description for this


Adjutant is a program the allows the extracting (ripping) of models from the Halo Game series. This means the Halo games for the console, like 3 - 4 (not not including Halo Wars, Halo CEA and Halo 2 A). Halo 2 is sort of integrated (I believe) but Halo 2 is already on PC (Vista), so it doesn't really need to much support when it comes to model extracting.

Models that can be extracted include (but are not limited to): Character models, scenery models, weapon models, vehicles models, etc.

However, Adjutant does not support animation extraction (from any Halo game) and does not have (as far as I know) any plans on adding animation extraction support. As from what I understand, extracting animations from the Xbox Halo games is rather complex and difficult to code properly across all games. Because from what I understand, each Halo game (like Halo 3 vs Halo Reach, or Halo Reach vs Halo 4 and so on) has a different method of how animations are used.

Other then the lack of animation extraction, Adjutant also supports (a semi-newer feature) BSP extraction. Meaning you can extract the actual game level that the character model moves about on. Though in Adjutant, the BSP file is called "sBSP", it still serves the same basic function as what you see in Halo CE.

I hope this has been helpful in saying what Adjutant is and does. Let me know vis posting if anything is confusing.

Halo CE General Discussion » Adjutant News and Info! Apr 11, 2016 03:08 PM (Total replies: 945)

Quote: --- Original message by: Mootjuh
Pretty sure the reason is Tiff is simply a better TGA because it supports 16 bit textures.


Sure Tiff can do that, but so can TGA. TGA image format supports 8, 15, 16, 24, or 32 bits of precision per pixel. So that isn't the reason why.

I got an answer (offline of Halomaps forums) about why Adjutant doesn't have TGA. It's because of the .NET framework that the the program is made from. Apparently coding in TGA files is not natively supported by the C# .NET framework. Meaning a custom coded method would have to be created in order for TGA to work properly within Adjutant.

So right now TGA isn't happening (as far as I am away), so TIFF files are the best texture file we can use with Adjutant.

Halo CE General Discussion » Adjutant News and Info! Apr 10, 2016 03:54 PM (Total replies: 945)

@ElijahB1:

I think I spoke to you about this before, but what is the reasoning behind TGA image formats not being used/implemented? I can't remember if it is because TGA image files are privately licensed, or the code needed to implement is almost non-existent.

ElijahB1, can you please verify? Or if anyone else knows why, then you are welcome to post about it too.

Thanks!

Halo CE General Discussion » Adjutant News and Info! Apr 10, 2016 01:19 PM (Total replies: 945)

Any news on any possible new features? Or maybe what (if any) the plan is for Adjutant?

Halo CE General Discussion » Adjutant News and Info! Sep 16, 2015 10:10 PM (Total replies: 945)

From what I understand, TGA (Or Targa) is not supported by the native coding language (which I think is .NET). And because of that, coding Adjutant to work with TGA files would require doing it from scratch. Try using CS4. I am using CC and I seem to be running into the same problem, but I've heard that CS4 seems to handle the Alpha channel without issue.

Halo CE General Discussion » Adjutant News and Info! Mar 30, 2015 01:25 AM (Total replies: 945)

Anyone know why the PNG extracted files do not have Alpha transparency channels with them?

When I extract textures with Adjutant (in PNG format) they don't have transparency with them. So textures that are decals, are showing up (when applied to meshes) without any sort of transparency.

Thanks for any help.

Halo CE General Discussion » Adjutant News and Info! Mar 29, 2015 11:02 PM (Total replies: 945)

I just found out Halo Online. How long has this thing been publicly known about?

(I feel SO out of the loop)

Halo CE General Discussion » Adjutant News and Info! Mar 16, 2015 01:35 AM (Total replies: 945)

Quote: --- Original message by: R93_Sniper
use the example to learn how to use the blueprints to set up the vehicle. Then learn a bit of vector physics to accomplish other goals such as the covenant vehicles.

I actually showed Master Noob the Halo 3 Ghost and tried to have him put that in. He figured something about in about 4 or so days. Guess it pays off to be smart


Lol, ya. Smart and knowing how to code will get you far with Game Development. Just wondering, did he use Blueprint or C++ for the Covenant vehicles? Trying to figure out (using Google) how to accomplish hovering base vehicles.


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